Adam McLane http://adammclane.com changing the world one blog post at a time since 2004 Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:32:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Early Bird Deadline for MSMC http://adammclane.com/2015/06/30/early-bird-deadline-for-msmc/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/30/early-bird-deadline-for-msmc/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:32:46 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16510 This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

REGISTER HERE

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/30/early-bird-deadline-for-msmc/feed/ 0
Be Dangerous http://adammclane.com/2015/06/29/be-dangerous/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/29/be-dangerous/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:21:42 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16504 @mclanea I don’t usually enjoy church tweets, but when I do, they’re from you. — Adam Lehman (@AdamLehman) June 28, 2015 This Twitter exchange with a former church worker turned entrepreneur reveals that there’s a bit of a leadership farce going on in our society right now. Everyone is getting labeled a leader. I mean, […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

This Twitter exchange with a former church worker turned entrepreneur reveals that there’s a bit of a leadership farce going on in our society right now.

Everyone is getting labeled a leader. I mean, everyone. The ultimate compliment a teacher can tell parents about their child? “Your child is a leader.”

You can buy books, take online courses, get an MBA, and attend conferences that pump people up to embrace their leadership potential.

And yet… most aren’t really leaders at all. They’ve just bought into the lie that they are a leader. They feel good about that title.

But they are tied to a job where they have no real power to lead. Or they are in a role which muzzles their thoughts or somehow tells them that their ideas aren’t worthy.

I ascribe by what I was taught. You know you are a leader by what happens when you are gone. Let’s say you go on vacation. Did things run the same or better? Then you’re doing your job as a leader. Or let’s say you move on to another role at another organization. Was there someone to continue on what you’ve been working on? Or did they just start over as if you’d never been there?

That’s the difference. When a leader has lead, others don’t just follow temporarily, you’ve inspired them to do something they couldn’t do had they not been lead by you.

I define a leader as this: A leader takes you where you would not or could not otherwise go yourself.

Alive Inside

If I’m honest about where I am today I don’t really care if someone looks at me professionally as a leader or not. The only place that really matters to me, leadership wise, in this stage of life, is leading my family with Kristen.

What I do care about professionally is doing stuff that makes me alive inside. Sometimes I post things and get texts in response like, “Man, think the same thing… wish I could post that but I’d get fired.

On the one hand, I get it. When you work for someone you willingly exchange some stuff for the security of a paycheck. I know that’s not ministry-friendly language, but that’s what you’re doing. It’s a willful choice. I remember teaching things that weren’t what I’d prefer to teach, but that was what I was asked to do… it’s part of being a professional.

But on the other hand, if you’re doing that for a long time you start to smell. A tiny part of you dies in your gut when you aren’t free to share who you really are, what you are really passionate about, or even lead the thing you’re paid to lead in a way that reflects your giftedness– a little bit of you dies each time you do that and takes up residence in your gut. You’ve exchanged temporary security for long-term health. This is what Marko likes to call “a values misalignment.” And just like a misalignment on your car, it might not be a big deal for a day or a week, but if you don’t deal with it eventually it’ll wreak havoc on every area of your life. In my language, if you do things long enough that aren’t your true self, you just start to stink.

It’s been 4 years since I left YS, 7 years since I left working for a local church– things I once thought were my dream jobs but came with a need to be something to someone else to fulfill a role they foresaw for me.

But today?

The muzzle is gone.

The filter is off.

And I’m more alive inside today than I’ve been in a long time.

Big Sky Bloomington

A few weeks ago I stumbled across a new blog from a high school acquaintance, Seja. While in the middle of a seemingly good career selling pharmaceuticals she started to realize that she and her husband were misaligned, they were pursuing a dream that wasn’t actually their dream for themselves.

Recently, she quit her job to pursue something she’s always desired for her family, especially her kids– owning a farm.

She writes about how her land found her in the middle of her commute, she found herself unable to avoid it. I liked the imagery. As you read her story you realize that her dream called her more than she pursued it, it’s a beautiful picture:

Again, I don’t even know why I did it. I loved it, of course, but I had passed other properties similar to this one.  I was drawn to this one so much so that just in case I didn’t drive by it again – our work territories changed all the time – I wanted to be able to preserve this sight.

These wants, these desires I experienced, I knew they came from deep inside.  I was drawn to it and it came from an authentic place – not to please anyone else or to ask someone else if they liked it too.  I knew I loved it.  And that was all.

And then we found our land.

Read the rest

As I’ve read her story I connect to the counter-cultural aspects of her journey. She’s given up the American Dream for her Family Dream… how much more powerful is that?

That’s dangerous.

For me…  the most dangerous person I can be is my true self. I’ve been made to say and do things that others can’t or won’t. It’s a blessing and a curse, but that’s who I am.

And I have a feeling that’s you, as well.

You weren’t created for domestication, you’ve got a bit of wild left in you.

You are wild. You are dangerous.

I’m here to tell you to go.

I’m here to testify that when you do that you’ll come alive in ways you never knew possible.

I’m here to tell you it isn’t easy– it’s scary as hell sometimes.

But I’m also here to remind you that you’ll never experience the thrill of free fall until you jump out of the plane.

Safety is a matter of perspective. 

Photo credit: Skydiving by Morgan Sherwood via Flickr (Creative Commons)

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/29/be-dangerous/feed/ 0
Saying Goodbye to Man’s Best Friend http://adammclane.com/2015/06/17/saying-goodbye-to-mans-best-friend/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/17/saying-goodbye-to-mans-best-friend/#comments Wed, 17 Jun 2015 15:47:51 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16500 Maybe I’m just sentimental? And maybe I’m having a hard time recognizing that our beloved dog is getting older? But this video got me all misty-eyed. How have you said goodbye to a favorite pet? 

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

Maybe I’m just sentimental? And maybe I’m having a hard time recognizing that our beloved dog is getting older? But this video got me all misty-eyed.

How have you said goodbye to a favorite pet? 

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/17/saying-goodbye-to-mans-best-friend/feed/ 0
40 Stereotypical Things to Write in a Yearbook http://adammclane.com/2015/06/16/40-stereotypical-things-to-write-in-a-yearbook/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/16/40-stereotypical-things-to-write-in-a-yearbook/#comments Tue, 16 Jun 2015 15:40:48 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16491 Megan is in her last week of 8th grade. Yesterday, I asked her what she did at school to which she replied, “Pretty much we signed yearbooks all day in class. Then we had a yearbook signing party at the end of the day.” And that got me thinking… “What does one write in a […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

Megan is in her last week of 8th grade. Yesterday, I asked her what she did at school to which she replied, “Pretty much we signed yearbooks all day in class. Then we had a yearbook signing party at the end of the day.

And that got me thinking… “What does one write in a year book?

With the help of my Facebook friends we created this list.

40 Stereotypical Things to Write in a Yearbook

Just to make it fun, my real world translation for each is in red.

  1. Stay cool (Julie F.) [I don’t really know you]
  2. My email address is 28384458383,2828@compuserv.com (Jason T.) [I am socially awkward and wanted to be friends, but didn’t get the nerve to take the first step]
  3. I’m the first to sign your crack. [Right along the binding] (Marty E.) [I think I’m original]
  4. Never change! (Marty E.) [Your yearbook got handed to me, I don’t know who you are]
  5. Always stay the same never change (Joanne H) [I went with the combo, props to you for getting the combo, not everyone gets it]
  6. K.I.T. (Jeff L.) [I have a lot of these to sign]
  7. I wish I could have known you better, but you seem like a really great person. (Jon M.) [Don’t call me, I’ll call you]
  8. Have an awesome summer!! (Julie F) [I don’t really know you]
  9. Let’s Keep in Touch (Alex B) [Probably not]
  10. HAGS (Sherry B) [I don’t know what to write]
  11. HAKAS (Andrew B) [I am pretty clever]
  12. Stay Sweet Always (Melissa B) [I don’t really know you]
  13. 2015 was great this year (Ryan S) [I am a teacher]
  14. Lylas – love ya like a sister (Aimee M) [We know each other from youth group]
  15. Friends forever! (Michelle R) [Probably not]
  16. I will always remember you! (Michelle R) [Probably not]
  17. Class of ’99!!! Next year we RULE THE SCHOOL! (Heather U) [I don’t really know you]
  18. Packing up the dreams God planted, in the fertile soil of you… (Tim G) [My dad is a pastor]
  19.  I know your future will be bright , I will miss you (Stacy K) [I’m not planning on seeing you next year]
  20. 2 good + 2 be = 4 gotten (Barb B) [I don’t really know you]
  21. 2 friends + 2 gether = 4 ever (Scott R) [I still listen to Boyz II Men]
  22. Have fun in the sun and get laid in the shade! (Adam K) [Can’t wait for your mom to read this while you are sleeping]
  23. See you in high school! (Christel A) [I don’t really know you]
  24. YOLO, so I hope you graduate this year finally. (Peter E. M.) [You are a slacker]
  25. To a cute girl with great clothes! (Terri G) [OMG, I can’t believe I got to write in your yearbook]
  26. Had fun with you in _____ class! (Deanna S) [I don’t really know you]
  27. We’ll always have ____ [teacher name] (Adam M) [We had some laughs in class, but we aren’t friends]
  28. I wish I could’ve known you more (Stacey K) [You are cute]
  29. Call me! (Gives someone else’s number) (Josh K) [I am clever for my age]
  30. God will do something good in your life. (Leneita F) [I don’t like you very much, but it’d be rude to not write something, so here you go]
  31. Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do (Jeff P) [My summer will be lame, hope yours isn’t]
  32. Live every day like it’s your last! (Jake A) [My summer will be lame, hope yours isn’t]
  33. Birds fly, ducks quack, I’m the first to sign your crack (Brock M) [I think I’m pretty clever]
  34. Too bad we didn’t hang out more……..text me (followed by number) (Jeffrey D) [I’m socially awkward but still want to hang out]
  35. Glad I got to know you (Karen K) [I don’t really know you]
  36. Best Friend 4-Ever (Heather U) [Probably not]
  37. Hope we stay friends, never change! (Mark K) [Emphasis on HOPE]
  38. I never told ya, but I think you have a great ass! (Donn B) [This is my last chance to hit on you]
  39. I’ll always remember how fun it was laughing with you in Mr. So-and-so’s class. (Jennie O) [I’m in AP and you’re probably not, I’m not planning on seeing you again]
  40. Have a bitchin summer. (Bill B) [Have a bitchin summer]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/16/40-stereotypical-things-to-write-in-a-yearbook/feed/ 1
Control Versus Self-Control http://adammclane.com/2015/06/15/control-versus-self-control/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/15/control-versus-self-control/#comments Mon, 15 Jun 2015 16:20:38 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16486   I’m really struck by the expectations put on parents today. A short list of some parental responsibilities: All the basics, like food, and clothing, oh– and a great place to live Unending emotional support Unlimited defense, we’re expected to be like our kids personal attorney + agent Picking the right school, pre-school through graduate school Getting them […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

 

I’m really struck by the expectations put on parents today.

A short list of some parental responsibilities:

  • All the basics, like food, and clothing, oh– and a great place to live
  • Unending emotional support
  • Unlimited defense, we’re expected to be like our kids personal attorney + agent
  • Picking the right school, pre-school through graduate school
  • Getting them the right teachers and right academic support
  • Making sure their school work is done, their projects are worthy of a perfect grade
  • Making sure their homework is done on time
  • Getting them to school on time
  • Personally delivering them wherever they need to be
  • Managing their schedule
  • Managing communication with all programs, schools, hobbies, religious activities, social activities
  • Making sure our kids have the right friends
  • Developing our kids social life
  • Making sure they have a hobby
  • Eliminating boredom
  • 24/7/365 safety, we are our kids Secret Service agents
  • 24/7/365 access to the internet, we are our kids IT department
  • 24/7/365 access to clean stuff, we are our kids personal maid
  • Personal chef, make food to their liking
  • Unlimited access to music, movies, television choices
  • A perfect childhood full of warm memories
  • Provide judgement free space for your child to explore personal interests, hobbies, potential vocations, unending ugly boyfriends, musical taste, clothing styles, etc.
  • Memorable family vacations
  • Providing regular educational opportunities
  • All the latest gear, electronics, play equipment
  • Fulfilling dreams
  • A shoulder to cry on when a dream is left unfulfilled
  • Possess a title or career they can brag about
  • Being there for them, upon request
  • Paying for whatever is asked… things with friends, school stuff, church stuff, etc.
  • Don’t forget investing in their spiritual well-being, it’s important that we make sure they are growing in their relationship with Jesus
  • Saving for college, that’s to say any college their 17 year-old self determines is best for their undetermined career goals
  • Unless they want a year off, we’ve got to pay for that gap year, too
  • Sin abatement, if they screw up… we need to provide a way to fix it
  • [Other responsibilities as assigned by a mommy blogger of a 3 year-old or a wanna-be mommy blogger doling out unqualified advice and guilt in exchange for being “blog famous.”]

Step Back

Have you ever taken a step back to think… WHAT THE HECK IS THIS EVEN ABOUT????

Sometimes I’m talking about my life as a parent or talking with a friend about parenting their kids and it hits me: Most of what we’re doing isn’t actually our responsibility. We’ve taken on that responsibility. We’ve decided all of that stuff above is on us.

And ultimately, it’s about control.

We want control.

We remove their control for our own and then blame them for driving us crazy because we think we can help them do things better than they could possibly do for themselves.

We try to navigate our children’s life for them.

Refocus on the Goal

Instead of controlling your child’s life, where we are ultimately lying to them that we can control everything…

Don’t teach control with your actions. Teach self-control.

Remember little old self-control? It’s a darned good character quality. It’ll serve your child better than the right school or the right stuff or that unnecessary trip to the children’s museum.

And if you’re controlling everything, taking responsibility for everything, and making everything easy?

They’ll never learn it for themselves. They’ll learn that to love someone means to take control of their everything. And that’s icky. 

Stop teaching control and start teaching self-control. 

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/15/control-versus-self-control/feed/ 2
Long-Range View of Leading Small Groups http://adammclane.com/2015/06/11/long-range-view-of-leading-small-groups/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/11/long-range-view-of-leading-small-groups/#comments Thu, 11 Jun 2015 16:32:10 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16481 I just completed my fourth season of helping to lead a small group of high school guys at my church. (Love being a volunteer and greatly enjoy not being in charge.) A couple years back I wrote a post, This Better be Worth It, about the mental game of carving out space to chose investing in […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

I just completed my fourth season of helping to lead a small group of high school guys at my church. (Love being a volunteer and greatly enjoy not being in charge.)

A couple years back I wrote a post, This Better be Worth It, about the mental game of carving out space to chose investing in high school small groups over investing in a lot of other things in my life– I’m giving up a night of my life each week, it better be worth it.

But I want to pass along another matrix altogether for week-to-week evaluation of that worth.

The Promise

You’re going to have bad weeks. Heck, you’re going to have bad months. You might even have a bad semester or whole school year where you’re pretty sure that you didn’t make an ounce of impact.

Leading a group of high school guys is often somewhere on a spectrum between herding cats and a DIY root canal. But that doesn’t mean it’s not worth it. Herding cats can have a purpose. And sometimes… you’ve got to do your own root canal.

I’ve been at this high school small groups thing since 1997, why in the world do I keep going?

The Long-Range View

  • Week-to-week means nothing compared to a memory sparked 10 years later.
  • High school students will only remember that you were a party pooper and you got pissed that they were talking or you scoffed at turning their small group into a night of American Gladiators… they won’t remember that week you pushed real hard to get through all of the content. 
  • I get real excited about faith steps… those tend to stick.
  • Conversely, I don’t get too worked up about week-to-week attendance. I take notice, but I don’t nag.
  • I call out deflection in an individual, but I also acknowledge that not every teenager is capable of being vulnerable.
  • When the whole group is deflecting I lean into that because I know we’re close to something important… which is why they are avoiding it.
  • I expect immaturity and allow room for it while asking them to push through it, it’s related to the bubble our society keeps teenage guys in. They have a lot of adults who chaperone them but very few who engage them in conversation or ask them to think.
  • I like that they get glimpses into manhood by being around me and my co-leader, but I’m not that interested in pushing them into “thinking like a grown man” and manhood too soon. (A mistake I see many make, almost like a default response to working with teenage guys.)

Ultimately, I am comfortable in my role. I know I’m not the most important adult male in their life. But I hope to be someone they can know for a long time, someone they can trust, someone they know they can talk to about real stuff.

After working with high schoolers for almost 20 years… that’s the stuff that I see lead to long-term spiritual growth. High school small groups provides some waypoints. But it’s ultimately mixed in with a lot of other messages, some of which land while others don’t.

In the end, you have to judge your role in students lives through the lens of your faithfulness to the calling and not on how last week or last month or last school year went. Because ultimately… that’s too soon to know. 

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/11/long-range-view-of-leading-small-groups/feed/ 1
My Hobbies Interest You http://adammclane.com/2015/06/10/hobbies-poem/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/10/hobbies-poem/#comments Wed, 10 Jun 2015 15:11:53 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16477 The fact that I have hobbies interests you. But the fact that you don’t concerns me. Yes, I work hard. But my life isn’t defined by my work. My identity is more wrapped up in who I am than what I do. I’m not an inanimate object defined in a sentence, I’m a person. A person […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

The fact that I have hobbies interests you. But the fact that you don’t concerns me.

Yes, I work hard. But my life isn’t defined by my work. My identity is more wrapped up in who I am than what I do. I’m not an inanimate object defined in a sentence, I’m a person.

A person made in the image of God. Made in the image of a God so big He can’t be defined; a God so big generations dared not whisper His name, a God we can describe better than we can identify.

I’m made in that image, I will not be narrowly defined to a one-sentence bio for your convenience. My life won’t fit in 140 characters either.

I am complex and simple. I’m a dad who still likes the input of his dad. I see myself wholly adequately inadequate. I’m perfect to my 4-year old, impossible to my 11-year old, worthy of an eye roll to my 14-year old. I’m still giddy when a woman I met 20 years ago holds my hand, that she still likes me, shocked that she still loves me; I’m inspired by her daily. Amazed that together we still like doing today together. But a single word I am not, cannot, will not. I am less. I am more. I am simple. I am complex.

The fact that I have hobbies interests you. The fact that you don’t concerns me.

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/10/hobbies-poem/feed/ 0
Why is Snapchat addictive? http://adammclane.com/2015/06/09/why-is-snapchat-addictive/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/09/why-is-snapchat-addictive/#comments Tue, 09 Jun 2015 17:05:14 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16471 Tech Tuesday question from Aaron R.  Snapchat. I feel like I am using it too much. I’m not worried about Snapchat not really deleting my pictures. I just feel that I’m using Snapchat to seek something else. I feel bad when I have all these stories and it looks like I am bragging but everybody […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

Tech Tuesday question from Aaron R. 

Snapchat. I feel like I am using it too much. I’m not worried about Snapchat not really deleting my pictures. I just feel that I’m using Snapchat to seek something else. I feel bad when I have all these stories and it looks like I am bragging but everybody does it so I think it’s okay. I Snapchat everything and I wish I could stop.

You’ve made a great observation, Aaron. What you are talking about is important for anyone that uses any app, not just Snapchat.

Sometimes we all need to take a step back and remind ourselves that we own the phone, the phone does not own us. 

Why is Snapchat so addictive?

Long story short, the app is designed to trigger a response in your brain that makes it so that you check the app without even thinking about it. (It’s not just Snapchat, virtually every app does this.)

Any time you get a new snap or scroll through stories or send a snap, your brain’s reward system is triggered. Getting a message or like or even sending a message feels so good at a sub-conscious that your brain just can’t get enough… kind of like your favorite candy… you don’t know why you ate the whole bag, but you did.

I first wrote about dopamine and interrupting the loop in 2012 in this post, Notifications are of the Devil, please take a few minutes to read that.

With something like Snapchat, which often might include flirtatious or even sexual content, it kind of “double triggers” your brain. You have the dopamine effect found in receiving any type of notification PLUS you have the normal hormonal response found in any potential sexual encounter. It doesn’t matter if you’re 13 or 39 or 99… if something sexual might happen, your brain will give it your full attention.

What can I do to make Snapchat less addictive?

I’m not a Snapchat user, but I do use other apps that are equally addictive. (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YikYak, etc.) Here’s how I take control of my usage… well, at least get better control of my usage:

  • Disable push notificationsHere’s how to do that for Snapchat.
  • Schedule Do Not Disturb to block out hours where you need to concentrate (work, school, sleep) – Here’s how to do that for iPhone and Android.
  • Only use your phone in public spaces of your life – Over the last 20 years of working with individuals and families I’ve learned that most addiction problems occur when internet connected devices are used in private. (Bedrooms, basements, bathrooms, etc.) No one sets out to get addicted to an app, online gambling, porn, etc… but it happens when we use the device in isolation for long periods of time. If you form a habit that you’re not going to use the device in private, you’ll eliminate most internet-related addiction problems.

Have a tech related question? Drop me a note on my contact form or send in your question via the form on the sidebar of my blog.

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/09/why-is-snapchat-addictive/feed/ 1
Grit http://adammclane.com/2015/06/08/grit/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/08/grit/#comments Mon, 08 Jun 2015 16:15:40 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16462 Yesterday, Paul caught a trophy fish. OK, so it’s not technically a trophy fish. He won’t win any awards and we didn’t even keep it. It was just a little spotted bay bass. But that one fish represents a major accomplishment. It was the first saltwater fish Paul caught completely unassisted from the shore.  He’d […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

Yesterday, Paul caught a trophy fish.

Instagram Photo

OK, so it’s not technically a trophy fish. He won’t win any awards and we didn’t even keep it. It was just a little spotted bay bass.

But that one fish represents a major accomplishment. It was the first saltwater fish Paul caught completely unassisted from the shore. 

He’d gone out with me at least 10 times over the past 9 months and never caught a fish. Probably 30 hours of fishing with no success. He’s had a lot of bites, lots of struggle to learn how to cast, and lots of coming up empty.

Finding Free Play

We live in a society that bores easily. Video games, the classroom, even our profession… we want nearly instant results. 

People want to do something for the very first time and see quick success when it just doesn’t work that way. In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell famously made the argument that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to become the best in a field. Although the precision of that claim has been discredited, the general concept behind it is true: If you want to get good at something you’ll need to practice and learn and find your own way of doing things.

To get good, at anything, you have to struggle past the mechanical stage of learning where you are thinking about how to do it to get into the muscle memory stage where you can stop thinking about how to do something to the point where you can start to play.

Success and innovation comes when we get to free play.

Watch anyone who is excellent at their craft and you’ll see that it often looks like play. Why does it look like play when they are doing something incredibly hard? Because it is play!

Grit

Few people get to free play… where a small success like catching a bass or a larger success like innovating software that changes the game while creating a great place to work.

You see, to get there you have to push past a lot of failure. Not cute failure. Not the failure you can laugh off as a learning experience. Actual failure.

There’s a characteristic that some people have and other people don’t, which is– in part– why some people succeed where others don’t.

So what is the difference between people who get to the success of free play and the people who just never quite seem to get there?

Researchers use one word: Grit.

Photo credit: Sandpaper by Lukasz Fabis via Flickr (Creative Commons)

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/08/grit/feed/ 0
Called to Plumbing http://adammclane.com/2015/06/04/called-to-plumbing/ http://adammclane.com/2015/06/04/called-to-plumbing/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 2015 16:53:39 +0000 http://adammclane.com/?p=16458 Ministry people [usually accidentally] make it seem like theirs is the only vocation with a calling, not so. One of the things I love about where we go to church is that it’s full of men and women who might get featured on Mike Rowe’s Dirty Jobs. Builders Military, ex-military Metal shop peeps HVAC experts […]

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>

Ministry people [usually accidentally] make it seem like theirs is the only vocation with a calling, not so.

One of the things I love about where we go to church is that it’s full of men and women who might get featured on Mike Rowe’s Dirty Jobs.

  • Builders
  • Military, ex-military
  • Metal shop peeps
  • HVAC experts
  • Dry wallers
  • Plumbers
  • Landscapers
  • Car mechanics
  • People who work on ships and boats
  • On and on…

These folks get their hands dirty, work alongside ordinary folks, and many of them are absolutely called to ministry right where they are.

They are doing what God made them to do. Our community needs folks like them, skilled laborers, hard working people with integrity, who serve their clientele with pride.

I Corinthians 10:31-33 says,

So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved.

Yup, you can sling grease or fix pick-ups or lay tile or roof houses to the glory of God. When you hang out with these folks and ask them about what they do… it’s so much more than a job: It’s a vocational calling!

It’s kind of a pet peeve of mine when people pick up the idea that if they are serious about ministry they’ll work in a church. (I should say that our church does a pretty good job of avoiding this trap.) It happens accidentally… of course, the preacher doesn’t really believe that his is a vocational calling to ministry and the plumber isn’t a vocational calling to ministry. But when the preacher talks a lot about his own life and not the life of the plumber… the congregation seems to pick up a narrative that the pastor is called to ministry and the plumber is not.

Yes, working in a church is one way to minister to people… absolutely. But let’s acknowledge that 9 out of 10 people aren’t going to walk into a church in order to connect to Jesus… so instead of hyper-inflating the calling of the role of the pastor, who might have access to 10% of the population, we should instead intentionally hyper-inflate, lift up, equip, and send out the ordinary folks in our congregations doing ordinary (yet, important) jobs in our community who have access to the other 90% of the population day in and day out.

Photo credit: The Plumber by by Rick via Flickr (Creative Commons)

This is original content from Adam McLane. © adam mclane

]]>
http://adammclane.com/2015/06/04/called-to-plumbing/feed/ 2