Categories
maturity Social Action

Fearing the right things

Franklin D. RooseveltContrary to popular belief– I do have fears.

Every day I ride my bike to work, I’m fearful of getting hit by a car.

When I’m out bodyboarding, I’m fearful of getting killed by a shark.

When my kids are late coming out of school, I’m fearful that something happened to them.

I have the same fears as everyone else. I recognize that there are things with which it is healthy to have fear.

But I refuse to be defined by my fears

Fears are often irrational. I’ve got a pretty slim chance of getting hit by a car, or killed by a shark, or that my kids will be kidnapped from their school.

That’s the rational reality.

So, I chose to not have my life defined by paralyzing fear of those things.

I have no fear of opportunity

The lens of fear is the wrong lens to judge an opportunity. You can’t worry about failure. You can’t worry about getting emotionally hurt. You can’t worry if people will like you. And you can’t worry about what people will think if you say yes or say no.

You need a better lens than that. You need a level head to determine whether an opportunity is good for you or not.

I often say no to ideas presented to me. But I never allow fear to be a part of the equation.

Why?

Deep down I know that I shouldn’t fear what could happen if something goes wrong. Instead, I fear what could happen if I don’t try.

As Franklin D. Roosevelt said, standing before the world on his inauguration day. With everything to fear– from wars on two continents looming, a depression lasting nearly a decade, and even his private battle with paralysis:

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. listen

Categories
Church Leadership management maturity

4 Things to Do With a Legit Opportunity

Let’s face it, success is about being opportunistic.

Here’s my simple outlook on opportunities. I’m thankful that I’ve made more right steps than wrong ones so far. But having the right outlook on the various ideas I’m presented with makes a huge difference.

  1. Pause to ask questions, hard ones. If you don’t ask how something will help you no one else will.
  2. Think about how you want to tie it in. You know what they say… if you don’t have a defined target you’ll miss it every time.
  3. Be audaciously bold. Wimps need not be opportunist. Go after things, with gusto!
  4. Go. Sitting on the sidelines will never get you anywhere. Nor will being shy or nervous about failure. Jump first, ask for forgiveness later.
Categories
management maturity mistakes Notre Dame

You’ve got to finish

My little football heart got broken last night. First, San Diego State gave up a touchdown with 50 seconds left to giveaway a victory to #25 Missouri. That would have been their best start in 30+ years. Then, a few hours later, Notre Dame gave up a silly trick play for a touchdown to lose to Michigan State.

In both cases, it was about finishing the game. Both teams were sloppy. In one game, a lack of tackling discipline cost them the game. In the other, being over-aggressive cost them an embarrassing lose and landed them on Sportscenter for all the wrong reasons.

For those of us who lead, both games were a powerful reminder for finishing.

In life, just like in football, your last play leaves a lasting memory. No one cares how well SDSU or Notre Dame played on Saturday. We’ll only remember the embarrassing finish.

Do you have a strategy for finishing a project well?