The Prince’s Posture

He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

John 1:11-13

The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children. Now if we are children, then we are heirs—heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ, if indeed we share in his sufferings in order that we may also share in his glory.

Romans 8:16-17

Do you have a Prince’s Posture?

Christians believe that Jesus’ work gave us access to the King of Kings. Not only do we have access through Christ– We are adopted as children of God.

Adopted children of the King with unlimited access to God. That’s status.

And yet, as I interact with Christians in leadership at their church, and especially as I interact with Christians in the public arena I’m appauled how many of us take a posture of weakness, irrelevancy, and… other postures unworthy of respect or the high calling we have on our lives.

We genuflect to the kings, demigods, and pseudo-powers of our society instead of carrying a prescence and posture of a prince.

A prince would never need to genuflect to a local lord. Nor would he entertain, beyond amusement, the solutions of those who didn’t have access to the knowledge he had.

But that’s the posture many people take in society.

The only thing worse than an arrogant prince is a weak, defeated one

A prince isn’t cocky, he is confident. A prince isn’t intimidated by challenges, he uses his resources to overcome. A prince isn’t lead by fools, he is entertained by them. He isn’t overcome by his insecurities in the public arena, as he knows his King owns the public arena and His Father has the power over the people. Ultimately, the prince isn’t worried worried what people think, because he understands that any power in the room belongs to his Father.

A Prince’s Posture

  • Self-assured
  • Confident
  • Clear-minded
  • Generous
  • Polite
  • Educated
  • Connected
  • A doer of his Father’s business, not a debater of what his Father might want

As we begin a new week, my encouragement for my fellow princes and princesses is to put on the Prince’s posture and put away the insecurities.

By Adam McLane

Kristen and Adam live in the San Diego neighborhood of Rolando with their three children.

4 comments

  1. Interesting perspective.

    For me personally, I tend to shy away from this kind of language because I have some family members that run with the televangelism crowd, who use similar language to teach health and wealth. On the other extreme, I wonder if we sometimes use humility as a cover up for low self-esteem.

    This is a good balance.

    1. Really good insights. Actually, I’d forgotten about most that since it’s so far from my own experience.

      You offer a fair assessment and critique, for sure.

      If I could push back a bit thought… At least in our imagination, the good prince walk in humilty to who he really is? Don’t we have the example of Christ’s incarnation to see how Jesus served the poor, had dinner with tax collectors, and otherwise hung out with country boys instead of with movie stars and other princes?

      There have been abuses… people teaching false gospels of health and wealth. But that doesn’t change the imagery so common in the New Testement.

      1. I agree with you. There have been abuses and unfortunately those abuses have made me shy away from such language. But it doesn’t change the language. I agree. I suppose I am rediscovering these texts in light of my experiences.

        I’m not sure what the right answer is. Like you said, I think it’s a balance between being humble in our interaction with others AND confident in our identity as children of God. Not arrogance, but not being a push-over, either.

  2. I struggle, and have always struggled with self esteem. A lot of it stems from my upbringing. I have had to learn, and still am, that I can have a confidence in my calling. That it is ok to be confident in what God uses His power through you to do for His glory. The moment you believe that it is your ability that makes you good at what you do, you start down the slippery slope of pride, and we know how God feels about that.
    This is good, and something I think we all should wrestle with a bit more. There is a beautiful balance in humility and confidence, and when it is balanced well…God is glorified!

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